Children’s emotional and mental health is affected by divorce, and as much as parents would want to keep them from having such distressful wellbeing, they can no longer retrieve the damage it will cause their child. The divorce itself is not the reason why a child suffers from a mental and emotional breakdown; it is the psychological need that was left unassisted. Therefore, it creates a lot of complications that only parents and health care professionals can help with.

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Consequence Of Divorce To A Child

The effects of divorce vary in most cases, and a child who is experiencing the event may encounter different healthcare needs. He tends to provide himself enough courage to change his behavioral aspects to be able to overthrow the emotional neglect that he spontaneously feels. Though some adjustments may take time to inject, both a young kid and adolescent may seem to have a standard approach to dealing with the problem. “This is a problematic aspect as one of the most likely issues leading to divorce is differences in parenting. To keep things civil as possible, the recommendation for approaching continuity is not about specific discipline but rather general expectations,” says Christine Hammond, MS, LMHC.

The intense feeling of loss and grief doubles up from the usual, and he soon develops a ridiculous amount of fear for neglect. In most cases, a child loses the ability to handle conflicts and ends up in isolation. He entirely sees the situation as a result of his misbehavior and feels responsible for the divorce. The marital conflict may result in the child becoming negatively unaware of his behavioral changes, creating dysfunctional progress to his overall development.

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Effect Of Divorce On Parents

Parents on the other hand (in most cases) have a brief processing condition that somehow abandons emotional stability. They often focus on the issue of divorce without considering a little bit of understanding of what their child has been dealing with. They have this eagerness to resolve the marital issue without noticing its effects on their child. Though they sometimes know what the emotional struggles of their kids are, they still lack the potential to create resolutions. As a result, parents lose their connection to their child and damage the parent-child interaction. Since it creates an emotional struggle for parents as well, they tend to appear more distant from their kids because of the stress and depression that divorce has brought them. The long-term effect of emotional neglect will most likely be devastating, and it will somehow remain unresolved.

The Long-term Effect

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Both parents and children can have a long-term effect on the case of divorce. They will soon end up neglecting their feelings and losing emotional attachment at some point. They’ll focus more on the negative results rather than look forward to the positive side. They will be prone to judgment and trauma that will affect their decision-making. They will also develop behavioral problems that might be hard to change or eliminate in the long run. As Kara Tamanini, M.S., LMHC suggests, “Allow your child to be involved in setting up the behavior plan but don’t let yourself be manipulated. Make sure you are firm and clear regarding the behaviors you want to see started and stopped.”

However, not all situations are alike, and there’s still a possibility that parents and children can generally adjust to the position. Though it is possible, it will still require a healthy psychological and emotional balance to be able to adapt to the process easily. Both parents and their children can have the ability to create a nurturing environment by merely working towards the intense emotional awareness they both have. Remember, “assure that BOTH you and your child are calm when speaking about behaviors. Convey understanding of their feelings and ask them what they think will help them to manage their emotions. Communicating while calm always results in more successful plans.” Barb Roba, LMCH said.

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